Where does Bengal stand in the Battle with Human Trafficking?

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Kolkata was declared the second safest city as indicated by the number of crimes per lakh of population. But, if one tries to form the bigger picture of where the state of West Bengal stands in terms of women’s safety, then the aforementioned fact is very misleading. The state of West Bengal ranks second in the number of crimes recorded against women. This state recorded the highest number of cases of human trafficking in 2016, with 44% of India’s trafficking victims belonging to West Bengal.

It’s a known fact that human traffickers prey on the most vulnerable girls and women, including those who flee their lands because of conflicts, and the poor and homeless. West Bengal saw the influx of 500,000 women from neighboring countries in the last few years. Among them were the Rohingya refugees crossing the India Bangladesh border with the help of dubious middlemen. The porous borders of Bengal allow the movement of refugees and once within the state, their unstable economic conditions make them easy targets for human traffickers.

The women and girls in some of the poorest regions of Bengal are lured with promises of good jobs in the city, and then forced to work in brothels. The fact that Kolkata is home to the largest red-light area in Asia shows the alarming state of trafficking for sexual exploitation in Bengal.

Considering how unchecked trafficking networks are in this state, there’s urgent need for better anti-trafficking systems — services that help track missing girls, efficient legal procedures that enable quick registry of and action against sex trafficking crimes, and many more measures.

Read more here: www.savemissinggirls.com/west-bengals-long-battle-with-human-trafficking-will-it-end

An Inside Story on Trafficking and Prostitution in India

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India is home to over 18 million people living under the shackles of modern-day slavery. And the number of victims of sex trafficking are between 3 and 9 million. In the last year alone, about 20000 women and children were smuggled out of the country for the purpose of trafficking, indicating a surge of 25% from the previous year, according to the Centre, though the unofficial figures are much higher.

As dusk falls, red light districts of India come to life. The dingy alleyways become clogged with hordes of men buying sex: young trafficked girls are sold for as low as $3. The brothels are filled with darkness, litters and used condoms. They evoke stories of dirt, destitution and despair. Young souls, who would’ve been sitting in their classrooms in schools, are found to be trapped in the hollows of prostitution, inflicted upon by their brokers or pimps. Many local charitable organizations are working towards freeing these girls from the clutches of flesh trade, and if you go by the numbers, at least 90% of the girls are victims of sexual slavery.

The sex industry is grim and grody; young girls of age 12 or 13 are forced into selling their bodies.  “Human trafficking dealers get good money,” explains an NGO worker. “You can buy a minor girl for 5,000 to 10,000 rupees ($75 to $150) in the north or in Nepal, and sell her in a metropolitan city for over 200,000 ($3,300). The younger the girl, the higher the price, especially if she’s a virgin.”

To continue reading, hit –  https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/9kdjy3/indian-authorities-wont-help-millions-of-trafficked-women

A lot of charities are coming forward nowadays to help, protect and rehabilitate these women and children. Missing is one of them; through their art through activism inspired installations, this organization aims to spread awareness about trafficking and its harmful effects on the society as a whole. Time to time, it organizes various child trafficking awareness campaigns and other relatable initiatives.

Continue Reading More About Children Going Missing

Sealdah Station: A ‘Child-friendly Station’ or a Deadly Trap of Traffickers?

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News flash: In India, a child is sexually abused every 15 minutes.

Narratives of abuse are poignant and acutely disturbing. At times they appear as stabbing headlines – ‘an 18 month toddler was raped in Kolkata’ but unfortunately most of them gets died down under the overpowering layers of ignominy, societal pressure and toxic norms and beliefs. Continue reading